Road Rules For Reid

Make Good Choices

Mother supports AT&T's 'no texting & driving' campaign

Mother supports AT&T's 'no texting & driving' campaign

Posted: Dec 28, 2010 5:52 PM EST Updated: Jan 01, 2011 9:39 PM EST

 

By Dal Cannady - bio | email 

METTER, GA ( WTOC) - Leigh Webb understands all too well the video in AT&T's "It Can Wait" campaign. The company hopes to keep drivers from texting and driving this New Year's Eve and beyond. Friday would have been Webb's son Reid's 22nd birthday. He died in a crash four years ago, before anti-texting laws in Georgia. But she believes he was likely texting behind the wheel.

"He believed nothing would ever happen to him and that's what every one of us thinks," she said.

The nationally distributed video shows people, drivers and victims, living with the impact of a crash brought on by texting. Leigh is glad to see such a campaign.

"It is rare for a telephone company to tell you not to use their product. They're saying 'don't use it because we care for you.' and it needs national attention to teach people it is a bad thing." she noted. "It's just as dangerous as drinking and driving."

AT&T is trying to raise awareness before December 31 because they feel that night is one of the busier nights of the year for texting as people send greetings as well as directions and information on holiday parties.

Leigh said even the best party of the year isn't that important in the bigger picture. She suggested everyone look through their most recent send messages to determine their value.

"Whatever that comment or question or answer was, if those are the last words you say to somebody, were those words worth losing your life over?" she said.

She hoped the video will help save someone the grief she and the people seen on screen have already experienced.

Copyright 2010 WTOC. All rights reserved.

Mother of wreck victim glad for new seatbelt law

http://http://www.wtoc.com/Global/story.asp?S=12392855

 Leigh Webb

                                                                         Leigh Webb

Mother of wreck victim glad for new seatbelt law

TWIN CITY, GA (WTOC) - Word of the new seat belt requirements in pickup trucks was bitter sweet to Leigh Webb.
 
"I immediately began to cry and say thank you Lord," she said Wednesday.
 
It brought back memories of her son Reid's death four years ago in a wreck where he was driving his truck but wasn't buckled. He was also texting. Lawmakers passed individual bills that addressed both this year.
 
"It has come full circle. I started this three years ago and now two of these issues have been addressed," she noted.
 
She spent Wednesday morning talking to male students in grades 6 to 12 at Emanuel County Institute. Reid was a student at ECI and died the summer before his senior year. Male teens are three times more likely not to use a seatbelt than girls the same age.
 
"Reid thought he was invincible. It did happen to him, it could happen to them. I tell them to buckle up every time," she explained.
 
She's used keychains, cards and billboards in a campaign called Road Rules for Reid to spread the message among teens.
 
Webb worried the law alone won't be a deterrent to adult drivers. Enforcement will be the key, she believes. She urges youngsters to get into the habit now.
 
"I tell them to not just think of themselves. Think of their parents, think of their peers, think of their younger siblings who see them as role models," she added.
 
She hopes they can have the life that her son missed.
 
For more information about her campaign, visit http://www.roadrulesforreid.com/

Copyright 2010 WTOC. All rights reserved.

Town Hall Meeting

 

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Sobering Message for Candler Co. Teens

Posted: April 6, 2008 11:55 PM EDT

Updated: April 9, 2008 10:09 AM EDT

Leigh Webb speaks to teens and parents in Metter.
Leigh Webb speaks to teens and parents in Metter.
Webb created a website in memory of her son that encourages students to drive responsibly.
Webb created a website in memory of her son that encourages students to drive responsibly.

METTER, GA (WTOC) -- With prom season approaching, many teens will face the temptation of drinking. One community wants to do something about it. Parents and teens in Candler County heard a sobering message tonight.

One of their friends, Reid Webb, died two years ago behind the wheel after drinking earlier in the day. His mother now speaks to teens and adults about the dangers of underage drinking. Another Metter parent, Gordon Lowe, lost his son to drunk driving 15 years ago, just hours before his prom. Both parents say it's never too early for families to start talking about this issue.

"It is real important to talk to your teen about drinking and the consequences it could have," explained Leigh Webb.

Webb created a website in memory of her son to encourage students to act and drive responsibly. It is called www.roadrulesforreid.com

Police described how a drinking arrest could affect getting into college and future jobs. They also talked about the penalties businesses face for selling alcohol to teens.

Reported by: Dal Cannady, dcannady@wtoc.com

 

Family Uses Son's Tragedy to Warn Teens

10/26/06
http://www.wtoc.com/Global/story.asp?S=5589796
The Webbs hope teens will keep the 'Road Rules for Reid' cards in their cars or trucks.
 
The Webbs hope teens will keep the 'Road Rules for Reid' cards in their cars or trucks.
 

Family Uses Son's Tragedy to Warn Teens

Earlier this year, WTOC told the story of an Emanuel County family who lost their son in a car crash. They hoped some rules of the road can save other teens (see Mom Hopes Son's Death Can Save Other Teens) Now they've taken their message to the roadways of their community. 

For the past year, Leigh Webb has felt her late son looking down from above. Now she can see him. Three new billboards memorialize Reid Webb, a teen who died behind the wheel last summer.

"First time I rode up on one, I stopped and just looked up at this beautiful child," she said. "I went to the store beside it and said ya'll have an awesome view."

Accident reports say Reid was speeding and wasn't wearing his seatbelt. Leigh says he was probably on his cell phone too and may have been drinking hours before. All of those factors pushed her to start Road Rules for Reid. She's now teamed with The Sunshine House, a regional child advocacy group.

"The Webb family has simply taken this tragedy and been willing to educate the public," explained executive director of The Sunshine House Carol Donaldson. "After all, this was a preventable death."

The Webb's have sold bracelets and T-shirts to raise money for teen driving education. The billboard outside Twin City hangs just around the corner from Reid's high school. Leigh and others hope the students at ECI and elsewhere get the message.

"Ya'll please follow these rules so you'll be here to graduate high school and go on to college and to have a family," she noted.

She hopes all this work keeps another family from feeling their pain.

Last year, 151 teens and children died in Georgia car accidents. The Webb's other billboards are located outside Metter and Swainsboro. To learn more about their cause, visit www.roadrulesforreid.com

Reported by Dal Cannady, dcannady@wtoc.com 

Savannah WTOC stories

Family Uses Billboards to Remind Teens

http://www.wtoc.com/Global/story.asp?S=6879148

Three new billboards memorialize Leigh Webb's son Reid, a teen who died behind the wheel last summer.

Three new billboards memorialize Leigh Webb's son Reid, a teen who died behind the wheel last summer.

Earlier this year, WTOC told the story of an Emanuel County family who lost their son in a car crash. They hoped some rules of the road can save other teens (see Mom Hopes Son's Death Can Save Other Teens) Now they've taken their message to the roadways of their community. 

For the past year, Leigh Webb has felt her late son looking down from above. Now she can see him. Three new billboards memorialize Reid Webb, a teen who died behind the wheel last summer.

"First time I rode up on one, I stopped and just looked up at this beautiful child," she said. "I went to the store beside it and said ya'll have an awesome view."

Accident reports say Reid was speeding and wasn't wearing his seatbelt. Leigh says he was probably on his cell phone too and may have been drinking hours before. All of those factors pushed her to start Road Rules for Reid. She's now teamed with The Sunshine House, a regional child advocacy group.

"The Webb family has simply taken this tragedy and been willing to educate the public," explained executive director of The Sunshine House Carol Donaldson. "After all, this was a preventable death."

The Webb's have sold bracelets and T-shirts to raise money for teen driving education. The billboard outside Twin City hangs just around the corner from Reid's high school. Leigh and others hope the students at ECI and elsewhere get the message.

"Ya'll please follow these rules so you'll be here to graduate high school and go on to college and to have a family," she noted.

She hopes all this work keeps another family from feeling their pain.

Last year, 151 teens and children died in Georgia car accidents. The Webb's other billboards are located outside Metter and Swainsboro. To learn more about their cause, visit www.roadrulesforreid.com

Reported by Dal Cannady, dcannady@wtoc.com 

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02/12/07
Mom Hopes Son's Death Can Save Other Teens
Road Rules for Reid memorial bracelets.
Road Rules for Reid memorial bracelets.

As more and more teens get behind the wheel, they have more and more things to draw their attention. Cell phones, other teens in the car, iPods and Mp3s to name a few. A recent study says car crashes are the leading cause of death for young people 15 to 24. That makes one Emanuel County mom's mission even more urgent.

As painful as her son's death was, Leigh Webb hopes her tragedy can save other teens. Last June, 18-year-old Reid Webb died in a crash when his truck went off the road.

"I got the call around 12:30 or 12:20 that there'd been a terrible accident and that he wasn't here anymore," she said through tears.

Accident reports say Reid was speeding and wasn't wearing his seatbelt. Friends say he'd been drinking earlier in the day. Add to that a combination of teenage distractions.

"He was notorious for talking on his cell phone and text messaging and we know during that time he'd been talking and text messaging to friends," she noted.

A recent national study on teens and the dangers of distracted driving further fuels Leigh's mission. Last fall, the Webbs went to Reid's high school to pass out cards with tips to drive safely.

The "Road Rules for Reid" are simple: buckle up every time, slow down, put down the cell phone and don't drink and drive. Simple suggestions that are sometimes difficult for teens who think they're invincible.

"When they get in the car and see the card, hopefully it will remind them as they're driving," Leigh said.

She just hopes to save as many teens, and their parents, from her own heartache.

The Webbs also created memorial bracelets they sell for five dollars each to establish a scholarship in Reid's honor and fund teen driving education. If you'd like further info, visit www.roadrulesforreid.com.

Reported by Dal Cannady, dcannady@wtoc.com